Scumble #11

Scumble:

"A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through." 
From The Artist's Handbook, by Ray Smith.  

A weekly highlight of some of posts I found interesting, most provocative, or otherwise caught my eye from the Science Artists Feed, and other sources. Sit back, have a machiatto with a dollop of foam and enjoy.  Lots to look at this week!


Click here for earlier Scumbles.

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Vision science: Seeing without seeing, Corie Lok, Nature News.

ROM Drawings, Sketchkrieg!

It's WHAT?, etcetera.  Painting with blood. Awesome.

Recycling, Drawing the Motmot.


What the Hell is a T.Rex?, Don't Mess With Dinosaurs. This is an excellent post, about the trendiness of certain scientific illustrations. Even that most noble of science-art traditions can fall prey to fashion.

Early science art, O'Reilly Science Art.

Visual art leading research - it's not happening, The Flying Trilobite, and followed by Examples of Visual Art Inspiring Science.

Cleaner Eurypterid, The Episiarch.

Couldn't help but notice..., O'Reilly Science Art.  Make your own molecular protein bunny!

Nucleosome Cross-stich, Fresh Photons.

Another warbird, A Curious Bestiary.

Runaway Star Plows Through Space, An Eye for Science.

Sue Johnson's hybrid organisms re-imagine second collection of General Pitt Rivers,
C
ulture 24.  Weird hybrid plants!

Art Evolved Call-Out: speed-painting Friday, Art Evolved.  David Maas suggests the Art Evolved crew and fans attempt to speed paint images based on questions at Ask A Biologist.  Click to the main Art Evolved page to see the resulting posts.

Eradicating Plant-Blindness in the 21st Century, ArtPlantae Today.

Fly Cankles and Literary Evolution, Biodiversity in Focus. Insect photographer + entomologist Morgan D. Jackson celebrates his 100th post with this phat entry.

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Original artwork on The Flying Trilobite Copyright to Glendon Mellow